Other Resources

From ACLU by Staff

The American system of government is founded on two counterbalancing principles: that the majority of the people governs, through democratically elected representatives; and that the power even of a democratic majority must be limited, to ensure individual rights.

Majority power is limited by the Constitution’s Bill of Rights, which consists of the original ten amendments ratified in 1791, plus the three post-Civil War amendments (the 13th, 14th and 15th) and the 19th Amendment (women’s suffrage), adopted in 1920.

The mission of the ACLU is to preserve all of these protections and guarantees:

    • Your First Amendment rights – freedom of speech, association and assembly; freedom of the press, and freedom of religion.
    • Your right to equal protection under the law – equal treatment regardless of race, sex, religion or national origin.
    • Your right to due process – fair treatment by the government whenever the loss of your liberty or property is at stake.
  • Your right to privacy – freedom from unwarranted government intrusion into your personal and private affairs.

We work also to extend rights to segments of our population that have traditionally been denied their rights, including Native Americans and other people of color; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals and transgender people; women; mental-health patients; prisoners; people with disabilities; and the poor.

If the rights of society’s most vulnerable members are denied, everybody’s rights are imperiled.

The ACLU was founded by Roger Baldwin, Crystal Eastman, Albert DeSilver and others in 1920. We are nonprofit and nonpartisan and have grown from a roomful of civil liberties activists to an organization of more than 500,000 members and supporters. We handle nearly 6,000 court cases annually from our offices in almost every state.

The ACLU has maintained the position that civil liberties must be respected, even in times of national emergency. The ACLU is supported by annual dues and contributions from its members, plus grants from private foundations and individuals. We do not receive any government funding.

Click on link below to go to the National ACLU website.  Click on Northern, Southern or San Diego links to go the websites of the area Affiliate for local assistance.

Click here

NAMI California maintains current guides and Inmate Medication Information forms that family members can complete and submit to the county jail where your relative is being held.  These forms allow the family to provide valuable information to jail personnel regarding medical history and current medications taken by your relative.

The CAMHPRA’s manual is intended to provide accurate general information regarding legal rights. It does not constitute legal advice. Because laws & legal procedures are subject to frequernt change and differing interpretations, CAMHPRA cannot ensure the information in the manual is current nor be responsible for any use to which it is put. Do not rely on this information without first consulting with an attorney or the patients’ rights office in your area regarding your particular situation.

Click here to see manual

The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation has responsibility for responsibility for enhancing public safety through safe and secure incarceration of offenders, effective parole supervision, and rehabilitative strategies to successfully reintegrate offenders into our communities. CDCR’s website contains a wealth of information about state prisons, visitation, services and programs.

Council on Mentally Ill Offenders (COMIO)

Mission

The leaders in criminal justice and mental health participating in this effort strive to end the criminalization of individuals with mental illness by supporting proven strategies that promote early intervention, access to effective treatments, a planned re-entry and the preservation of public safety.

Vision

A true shift in the paradigm between criminal justice and mental health will embody an effective jail diversion system that fosters an ongoing and successful exchange of information among courts, criminal justice agencies, mental health professionals, government and non-government organizations to achieve a substantial positive change in the way individuals with mental illness are treated in our communities

Consensus Project

From Criminal Justice/Mental Health Information Network by Staff

The Consensus Project is a project of the Criminal Justice/Mental Health Information Network coordinated by the Council of State Governments Justice Center.  It is an unprecedented, national effort to help local, state, and federal policymakers and criminal justice and mental health professionals improve the response to people with mental illnesses who come into contact with the criminal justice system.

The landmark Consensus Project Report, which was written by Justice Center staff and representatives of leading criminal justice and mental health organizations, was released in June 2002. Since then, Justice Center staff working on the Consensus Project have supported the implementation of practical, flexible criminal justice/mental health strategies through on-site technical assistance; the dissemination of information about programs, research, and policy developments in the field; continued development of policy recommendations; and educational presentations.

The Criminal Justice/Mental Health Information Network (InfoNet) builds and expands on previous efforts to collect program information as a resource for policymakers, practitioners, and advocates working to improve outcomes when people with mental illnesses come into contact with the criminal justice system.

The goal of Assertive Community Treatment is to help people stay out of the hospital and to develop skills for living in the community, so that their mental illness is not the driving force in their lives. Assertive community treatment offers services that are customized to the individual needs of the consumer, delivered by a team of practitioners, and available 24 hours a day. This link to the SAMHSA Evidenced-Based Practices page provides a number of documents that will help to implement an Assertive Community Treatment program.

From www.leginfo.ca.gov by Staff

The California Law page allows you to search and view California Law of 29 codes, covering various subject areas, the State Constitution and Statutes. Information presented reflects laws currently in effect. All California Codes have been updated to include the 2007 Statutes.

From Friends Outside by Staff

About Friends Outside

We are a nonprofit community based organization that has been providing programs and service to families and individuals involved in the criminal justice system since 1955.

We believe in respect for others; in the capacity of human beings to change; and in the importance of the family and the community in the development of resilient, responsible and capable people.

A Brief History

In 1955, Rosemary Goodenough, an Englishwoman living in California, began the work that was to become “Friends Outside”. A Quaker and a tireless advocate for social justice, she created and nourished a Mission that has continued for over fifty years. The year 1955 was the heart of the McCarthy Era….a time of great conformity and rigid social structures and norms. It was also the year that Rosa Parks refused to sit at the back of the bus. Rosemary defied conventions of the time and spoke out loudly and clearly for incarcerated people, for their families, and for their children. It was a time of change. Rosemary recruited allies in the faith community, in corrections and law enforcement, in the California Legislature and in the United States Congress.This commitment to advocacy lives on in the Mission and in the work.

Friends Outside is an organization based on principles; it is a network of agencies who share Mission and name; and it is a way of life. In 1985, the community-based chapters that were part of Friends Outside National Organization became separately incorporated.

Today, they are represented by our eight chapter/affiliates. We continue to share Mission and name; we continue to share joy in the work.

Together, we make a difference.

You may have a legal problem and not know how to resolve it. Lawyers have been specially trained in the law and our legal system. And the right lawyer can advise and assist you with your particular problem.

If you are facing criminal charges or a lawsuit, for example, a lawyer can help you understand your rights, and the strengths and weaknesses of your case. A lawyer knows the rules and procedures for arguing the case in court. And a lawyer can make a big difference in whether or not your side of the story is successfully presented to a judge or jury.

A lawyer can help you get a divorce, file for bankruptcy or draw up a will. Or, if you have been seriously injured or mistreated, a lawyer can help you file a lawsuit. Some lawyers handle a variety of legal problems; others specialize in certain areas of the law.

In some instances, failing to call a lawyer immediately can make the situation worse. If you are arrested or involved in a serious auto accident, for example, someone should interview the witnesses and gather evidence as soon as possible.

In other situations, preventive legal advice could save you time, trouble and money by preventing legal problems before they arise. Take, for example, the purchase of your family home or car. You might have a problem in the future if you sign the purchase agreement without completely understanding it. Or maybe you are launching a business with a partner. A lawyer could point out the advantages and drawbacks of various partnership arrangements.

These are just a few of the many situations in which lawyers can provide advice and assistance.

From USLegal.com by Staff

Legal Definitions are provided for public use and knowledge.

US Legal, Inc provides legal information in the form of Questions & Answers, Definitions, Articles, Blogs and Reporting on various subjects in the United States legal field. You can also find an attorney or buy legal forms for Pro Se representation. US Legal seeks to simplify and break down the barriers to legal information.

Nolo is the nation’s oldest and most respected provider of legal information for consumers and small businesses.  This listing takes you to the Nolo glossary of legal terms.

Mental health courts have spread rapidly across the country in the few years since their emergence. In the late 1990s only a handful of such courts were in operation; as of 2007, there were more than 175 in both large and small jurisdictions. The links on this page address a series of commonly asked questions about mental health courts. Click here

NIMH Vision

NIMH envisions a world in which mental illnesses are prevented and cured.

NIMH Mission

The mission of NIMH is to transform the understanding and treatment of mental illnesses through basic and clinical research, paving the way for prevention, recovery and cure.

For the Institute to continue fulfilling this vital public health mission, it must foster innovative thinking and ensure that a full array of novel scientific perspectives are used to further discovery in the evolving science of brain, behavior, and experience. In this way, breakthroughs in science can become breakthroughs for all people with mental illnesses.

In support of this mission, NIMH will generate research and promote research training to fulfill the following four objectives:

  • Promote discovery in the brain and behavioral sciences to fuel research on the causes of mental disorders
  • Chart mental illness trajectories to determine when, where, and how to intervene
  • Develop new and better interventions that incorporate the diverse needs and circumstances of people with mental illnesses
  • Strengthen the public health impact of NIMH-supported research

To reach these goals, the NIMH divisions and programs are designed to emphasize translational research spanning bench, to bedside, to practice. For targeted priorities and funding initiatives, please visit our division websites

From California Association of Mental Health Patents’ Rights Advocates by Staff

This listing provides direct link to Chapter 18 – Forensics of the California Association of Mental Health Patients’ Rights Advocates Patient Rights Manual regarding forensic clients.  Manual addresses issues relating to incarceration of mentally ill individuals.

The Reentry Policy Council (RPC) was established in 2001 to assist state government officials grappling with the increasing number of people leaving prisons and jails to return to the communities they left behind. The RPC was formed with two specific goals in mind:

  1. To develop bipartisan policies and principles for elected officials and other policymakers to consider as they evaluate reentry issues in their jurisdictions.
  2. To facilitate coordination and information-sharing among organizations implementing reentry initiatives, researching trends, communicating about related issues, or funding projects.

The Reentry Policy Council is a national project coordinated by the Council of State Governments Justice Center, a national nonprofit organization that serves policymakers at the local, state, and federal levels from all branches of government.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) maintains an extensive dictionary of medical and mental health terms and definitions on their website. Click Here